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Environment Research and Technology Development Fund S-13 Development of Coastal Management Method to Realize the Sustainable Coastal SeaEnvironment Research and Technology Development Fund S-13 Development of Coastal Management Method to Realize the Sustainable Coastal Sea

Home » Objectives » Topic 4: Proposed economic assessment and integrated coastal management model for ecosystem services in coastal areas

Topic 4 Proposed economic assessment and integrated coastal management model for ecosystem services in coastal areas

Outline

The economic value of ecosystem services in coastal zones of Japan will be calculated and a sustainability assessment will be performed. Integrated management methods needed for coastal zones to ensure the sustainable development of coastal zones will be proposed. The “Sato-umi” stories needed to connect non-fishing residents with coastal areas and involve them in coastal area management will be discovered or created and passed on. Methods for coordinating fishery activities in the Tsushima and Goto marine protected areas (MPA) will also be proposed.

Subtopic Leader Kenichi Nakagami (Professor, Ritsumeikan University)

Subtopic (1) Economic assessment of ecosystem services

Description of Research (FY 2014 – 2015 Achievements)

(1) (a) Review of coastal zone development project: We conducted an opinion survey for the members of the Miyagi Prefecture Fisheries Cooperative Shizugawa Office and the Hinase-cho Fisheries Cooperative, and we conducted preparatory coordination for an opinion survey for the Ishikawa Prefecture Fisheries Cooperative Nanaka Office.
(b) Measurement of ecosystem services, identification of the ecosystem services to be evaluated, and study of scenarios for use of the Stated Preferences method. We conducted an online survey to determine long-term changes relating to the economic value of ecosystem services, with the coastal areas of the Seto Inland Sea as the target region, and made the results public. We also conducted a mail-in survey for residents of the coastal areas of Hiroshima Bay to evaluate the “beauty and abundance of the ocean” from the standpoint of economic value.
(c) Independent estimates using the Constanza method: a database was constructed and applied to tidal flats.
(d) Sustainability assessment, collection of case studies of sustainability assessments for coastal zones, and establishment of an assessment method: These were applied to the Seto Inland Sea. We also conducted a survey of environmental education using Zostera in the Hinase district of Bizen City, Okayama Prefecture.

Description of Research (FY 2016 Plan)

(1) (a) Review of coastal zone development project: As a continuation of the research from FY 2015, we will conduct an opinion survey for the members of the Miyagi Prefecture Fisheries Cooperative Shizugawa Office and the Hinase-cho Fisheries Cooperative, and will also conduct an opinion survey for the Ishikawa Prefecture Fisheries Cooperative Nanaka Office. (b) Measurement of ecosystem services, identification of the ecosystem services to be evaluated, and study of scenarios for use of the Stated Preferences method: We will conduct an online survey of the economic value of ecosystem services, breakwaters and “the linkage of forest, river and ocean” as symbolized by the phrase “the forests are the lover of the ocean” for Shizugawa Bay in Minami-Sanriku-cho, Miyagi Prefecture.
(c) Independent estimates using the Constanza method: We will use the Constanza method to assess the economic value of coastal zones in Japan.
(d) Sustainability assessment, collection of case studies of sustainability assessments for coastal zones, and establishment of an assessment method: We will refine the sustainability assessments for the Seto Inland Sea and conduct a scenario analysis. In addition, continuing the research from FY 2015, we will conduct a survey of environmental education using Zostera in the Hinase district of Bizen City, Okayama Prefecture and report on its significance.

Subtopic Leader Kenichi Nakagami (Professor, College of Policy Science, Ritsumeikan University)

Subtopic (2) Proposed three-stage management method for coastal seas

Description of Research (FY 2014 – 2015 Achievements)

(2) We continued to analyze case studies of Sato-umi and autonomous coastal zone management efforts, and also analyzed comprehensive coastal zone management efforts in four target ocean regions for analysis, as well as case studies of efforts at the ocean region and open sea level in sectors other than coastal zone management. Based on the results, we identified the causes hindering the achievement of wide-area comprehensive management as well as points for improvement. In addition, we raised examples of efforts in other countries with institutional frameworks similar to the three-stage management method and worked to determine the current state of coastal zone management systems.

Description of Research (FY 2016 Plan)

(2) We will sum up the results of the study of case studies conducted up to now according to governance levels and organize the key points for management at each level. In addition, we will gather wide-ranging case studies of management in ocean regions and the open sea that go beyond prefectural jurisdictional boundaries, and analyze case studies of cooperation between states with regard to Chesapeake Bay, in order to find ways to achieve cooperative prefectural governance. Based on the above, we will determine the usefulness of a theoretical framework for multi-stage management based on the three-stage management method established in FY 2015 and search for issues to be resolved, in order to improve the hypothesis.

Subtopic Leader Takeshi Hidaka (Professor, Faculty of Humanity-Oriented Science and Engineering, Kinki University)

Subtopic (3) Discovery, construction and passing on of stories that connect the general public with coastal seas, based on discussions from a humanities perspective

Description of Research (FY 2014 – 2015 Achievements)

(3) With regard to the three ocean regions targeted by S-13 “Development of Coastal Management Method to Realize the Sustainable Coastal Sea” (a Special Project of the Ministry of the Environment), we worked to identify the distinguishing characteristics of the lifestyle and culture of the Sato-umi in three research regions: the Hokuriku region (Sea of Japan coast), Shizugawa (Sanriku coast) and the Geiyo region (Seto Inland Sea). With the assistance of local fishery cooperatives, museums and so on in each location, we studied the ecosystem, fishing, culinary culture and so on in each region. We also began collecting information on organizations that are engaged in hands-on efforts to revitalize the Sato-umi.

Description of Research (FY 2016 Plan)

(3) In each of the three ocean regions, we studied the ecosystem, fishing, culinary culture and the like and were able to determine the unique characteristics of each ocean region. As a result, we confirmed that the traditional fish-eating culture in various parts of Japan is in crisis and threatened by a loss of diversity. Our goal is to conduct an overall assessment of the scenic beauty, fishery operations, fish-eating culture and other desirable aspects of the Sato-umi and conduct field surveys to collect information on examples of successful efforts to revitalize the Sato-umi, focusing on organizations engaged in hands-on activities of this nature.

Subtopic Leader Toshihide Innami (Professor, Department of Regional Policy, Aichi University)

Subtopic (4) Coordination of fisheries activities in the Tsushima and Goto marine protected areas

Description of Research (FY 2014 – 2015 Achievements)

(4) We gathered local knowledge about the sea surrounding the islands and turned it into a scientific methodology based on coastal environmental science techniques. We focused in particular on the study of the protected species in marine protected areas and ocean and climate phenomena. Through observations and discussions in many sectors, we also worked to determine the relationship between organisms and flows as they relate to land and sea interaction, based on local phenomena, and the relationship between the Tsushima warm current and seasonal winds.

Description of Research (FY 2016 Plan)

(4) We will improve the accuracy of converting local knowledge of the sea into scientific knowledge. In addition to coastal environmental science techniques, we will develop a methodology that also includes history and culture and leads to opportunities for consensus-building. We will also focus on the use of the ocean that belongs to the people, and will work to identify species that need protection in marine protected areas and to clarify categories. We will also maintain venues for free discussion by diverse entities and turn them into a toolbox for establishing marine protected areas. We will also use floating buoys and the like to visualize the connectedness of land and ocean and the wide-area connections provided by the Tsushima warm current. In this way, we will pursue an understanding of the natural mechanisms of the ocean and work to strengthen cooperation among related entities.

Subtopic Leader Satoko Seino (Associate Professor, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyushu University)